A drainage engineer carrying out a CCTV drain inspection on a residential property.

Have you ever noticed that when it rains your driveway floods or your backyard collects pools of water? You may be in need of a drainage plan.

A drainage plan is a detailed plan that outlines the best practices for diverting water away from your property, keeping your structure and landscape safe from flooding and damage.

A comprehensive drainage plan should include a variety of methods and materials and be tailored to your specific property and environment. This guide will provide all the information you need to create the perfect drainage plan for your property. From understanding the basics of drainage to choosing the best materials and methods, this guide will walk you through each step of the process.

With the help of this guide, you can easily design and implement a drainage plan that will protect your home for years to come.

 

Understanding the Basics of Drainage

Drainage is the process of removing excess water from your property, typically through the use of ditches, trenches, or channels. Drainage systems are used to prevent water from flooding your landscape and structure and to prevent water from stagnating in your landscape.

A well-designed drainage system on your property will divert water away from your home or landscape, either by directing it to a nearby water source or by collecting and diverting it to an appropriate location.

Drainage systems can be implemented through a variety of materials and methods. The best materials and methods will depend on a number of factors, including the size of the drainage area, rainfall levels, the cohesiveness of the soil, and the type of vegetation that will be affected.

There are three main types of drainage systems: natural drainage systems, artificial drainage systems, and combined drainage systems.

A natural drainage system allows water to flow naturally through the landscape. An artificial drainage system redirects water away from the landscape through man-made channels and structures. A combined drainage system combines elements of both natural and artificial drainage systems.

 

Assessing Your Property for a Drainage Plan

Before you begin creating a drainage plan, you need to assess your property to determine what kind of drainage plan will be most effective.

First, you need to carefully consider how your property will be most commonly used. Will it be used primarily for recreation, such as hiking or camping, or will it be used for residential purposes, such as gardening or livestock?

Once you’ve determined what activities your property will be used for, you need to determine how the water on your property will flow. You should know where water will collect, as well as any areas where it will be naturally diverted.

Additionally, you need to know the soil type on your property, including its cohesiveness. Knowing your soil type will help you choose the best materials and methods for your drainage plan. Furthermore, you should be aware of any nearby water sources, such as lakes, rivers, or ponds. These sources can affect your drainage plan, especially if you use an artificial drainage system.

 

Choosing the Right Materials and Methods for Your Drainage Plan

Once you’ve assessed your property, you can begin choosing the right materials and methods for your drainage plan. First, you should determine what type of drainage system you’d like to implement.

If you’d like to implement a natural drainage system, you’ll need to choose the plants and trees that will best suit your property. If you’d like to implement an artificial drainage system, you’ll first need to identify the water that will be diverted and choose a location for it to be collected.

You should choose a location that is away from your property and structures, but is close enough to a water source to collect water from multiple areas. Finally, if you’d like to implement a combined drainage system, you’ll need to choose elements of both natural and artificial drainage systems, such as using plants to direct water to an artificial channel.

Once you’ve determined what type of drainage system you’d like to implement, you can begin choosing the right materials and methods. The best materials and methods will depend on the size of the drainage area, rainfall levels, the cohesiveness of the soil, and the type of vegetation that will be affected.

 

Designing Your Drainage Plan

Now that you’ve chosen the right materials and methods for your drainage plan, you can begin designing it.

First, your architect will require you to organize create a drainage map of your property that identifies the locations of your foul and surface water infrastructures, where water will collect and where it will be naturally diverted. You should mark any existing features, such as channels, ponds, or other structures on the drainage plan.

Next, add your chosen materials and methods to your map, indicating where each will be implemented. Finally, add any additional structures that you’d like to implement, such as a weir or a channel to redirect water.

Once you’ve designed your drainage plan, you can begin implementing it. First, mark the location of each feature on the ground using a shovel, string, or other method.

 

Implementing Your Drainage Plan

Next, begin digging and installing your chosen materials and methods, following the design outlined on your map. Once you’ve implemented your drainage plan, you should periodically maintain the system.

This will ensure that it continues to operate effectively and that it lasts for many years. Maintaining your drainage system will vary depending on the materials and methods used.

 

Maintaining Your Drainage System

Maintaining your drainage plan will vary depending on the materials and methods used. For example, when working with plants, you should periodically remove weeds and prune branches and foliage to ensure that they continue to direct water away from your property and do not grow into the pipes.

Additionally, you should keep an eye out for rodents and diseases that can affect your plants. When using artificial materials, such as channels and weirs, you should periodically clean and inspect these structures for wear and tear.

Finally, you should regularly check nearby water sources to ensure that they continue to drain into your property.

 

Commonly Asked Questions About Drainage Plans

How often should I maintain my drainage plan?

That depends on the materials and methods used. For example, you should prune and remove weeds from your plants at least once per year. You should clean and inspect your artificial materials at least once per season. Finally, you should check nearby water sources at least once per year.

How do I know if I need a drainage plan?

You need a drainage plan if water is consistently pooling on your property, there are frequent floods, or your landscape is waterlogged.

Is there a specific time of year when I should implement a drainage plan?

Yes, you should implement a drainage plan during the drier months of the year, typically from fall through spring. This time frame will help ensure that your drainage plan has time to settle in and begin diverting water away from your property before the area becomes wet again.

What are some alternative options to a drainage plan?

If your property has a relatively small drainage area or if you simply don’t want to implement a drainage plan, you can install sump pumps to divert water away from your property. You can also use drainage mats, which are engineered to trap water so that it doesn’t collect in your landscape.

 

Conclusion

A drainage plan is a crucial step in protecting your property from excessive water, as well as preventing water-related damage and expenses.

Before implementing a drainage plan, you need to assess your property to determine the best location for your drainage system, as well as choosing the right architect and drainage company for your drain plan.

Once you’ve designed your drainage plan, you can begin implementing it. You should periodically maintain your drainage plan to ensure that it continues to operate effectively and lasts for many years.

A drainage plan is an essential part of protecting your property from water damage.